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    Interviews with a Landscaping Designer

    How to Get Started with Landscape Design

    When you want to update your outdoor space, there’s often no better way to really get the garden you want than with landscaping. While the entire process of planning and cultivating a perfect space may prove to be difficult without the help of an expert landscape gardener/architect, incorporating the right kind of design doesn’t have to be too difficult.

    What to do before you hire a professional landscaping expert

    It’s no secret that the installation and overall finish of your design may benefit from being handled by a professional (or professionals), but getting the absolute best from your space can be defined by your personal needs. This is why it can be a good idea to determine exactly what you want before you hire help.

    It may be worthwhile to first consider the following factors:

    • If you are hoping to regularly entertain guests
    • If you want a calming space to relax
    • If children or pets will be using the garden
    • How much you want to maintain plants and features
    • If you want to create a space that fits the local landscape
    • If you want a multifunctional space
    • If you want style over function

    Once you have these things in mind, a professional should be able to help you to realise your ambitions – and advise you in areas where certain elements may not be possible (i.e. if the soil or conditions of your garden won’t cater to specific plants).

    Choosing the right design for your landscaping

    As with décor and architecture, there are a range of styles that can characterise the overall look and feel of your garden (as well as impact it’s performance), so it may be a good idea to specify your chosen design before beginning the planning phase of your landscape project.

    Naturally designed gardens are often created to establish a simpler, more organic space that needs little to no maintenance (or even chemical intervention) to flourish. Homeowners may want to blend their garden into the surrounding scenery for a more native feel.

    On the other side of the coin, manicured gardens typically function in the opposite way. Often defined by strict guidelines (think symmetrical patterns and beautifully trimmed greenery), cultivated spaces tend to offer a more uniform, high-maintenance space.

    Some homeowners like to incorporate cultural design elements into their spaces to maximise the look or functionality to suit their needs. For example, a typical English garden may feature shrubbery and perennials, as well as stone features like statues and bird baths. These types of gardens can be medium in maintenance and can vary in functionality to suit. Oriental styles tend to be more relaxed in feel and feature more installations than plant-life (such as water features and rock formations) and tropical styles generally integrate drought-resistant plants and gravel for a stylish yet easy to maintain aesthetic.